Showing posts with label Animal Rescue. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Animal Rescue. Show all posts

July 6, 2019

Brevard Zoo News - New Life & New Releases!


Rock hyrax pups born at Brevard Zoo
MELBOURNE, Fla., July 5, 2019 — Brevard Zoo welcomed two rock hyrax pups on Wednesday, June 19 to mother Buffy and father Fangs. The newborns have been named Turnip and Radish by keepers, and their sexes are unknown at this time. They are not yet visible to Zoo guests.
“Last year, Buffy and Fangs gave us babies Gnocchi and Hashbrown,” said Michelle Smurl, the Zoo’s director of animal programs. “This year, they’ve given us two more furballs, both of whom appear to be in excellent health.”
Gestation for rock hyraxes lasts six to eight months and females can give birth to up to four pups per litter.
Although hyraxes only weigh about eight pounds as adults, their closest living relatives are elephants and manatees. This species is found in rocky, arid habitats throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Human hunting has led to population decline in some areas.

 Brevard Zoo to release rehabilitated sea turtle
MELBOURNE, Fla., July 6, 2019 — Following a stay at Brevard Zoo’s Sea Turtle Healing Center, juvenile green sea turtle Kona will be returned to the ocean at Bonsteel Park in Melbourne Beach on TuesdayJuly 9 at 4 p.m. through a partnership with the Barrier Island Center.
Upon admission to the Healing Center on April 7, Kona appeared lethargic, was covered in barnacles and had trouble staying underwater. This sea turtle was treated with medication, fluids and nutritious food by Zoo staff and volunteers.
This event is open to the public, and a filming and viewing area will be reserved for media. All media personnel are asked to check in with a Healing Center volunteer upon arrival. Accessibility mats will be in place for wheelchair, walker and stroller users.
More information about Kona is available at www.brevardzoo.org/meet-the-patients-kona.
Brevard Zoo is home to more than 900 animals representing 195 species from all over the world. As a not-for-profit organization, it is a leader in the fields of animal wellness, education and conservation. More information is available at www.brevardzoo.org.
Treetop Trek features five aerial obstacle courses that whisk guests above parts of the Zoo and through lush Florida landscapes. More information is available at www.treetoptrek.com.

June 9, 2019

Fifty-Five Years and More Than 35,000 Rescues in, SeaWorld Experts Reveal Threats To Marine Wildlife Are Accelerating

SeaWorld Rescue Launches Instagram Channel Ahead of World Oceans Day

ORLANDO, Fla. (June 7, 2018) – Since 1964, the same year SeaWorld first opened its gates, SeaWorld’s rescue teams have been on the frontlines of giving ill, injured, orphaned or abandoned animals a second chance at life.  Today, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment announced that SeaWorld Rescue has now come to the aid of more than 35,000 marine and terrestrial animals in its 55-year history. Trends in rescue data suggest that the impact of human activity on our oceans, such as plastic pollution, is taking an increasing toll on marine wildlife in recent years.

To grow awareness of the threats facing wildlife, the company also launched a new SeaWorld Rescue channel on Instagram ahead of World Oceans Day that tells the story of rescue, rehabilitation and release, as seen through the eyes of those on the frontlines of saving animals.

“As an organization, we want to get to a place where we conduct fewer rescue operations, not more, but right now there are a lot of ill, distressed or stranded wild animals in need,” said Jon (JP) Peterson, Senior Leader of Zoological Operations at SeaWorld Orlando, who has personally assisted thousands of distressed animals. “We’re not there yet, but there’s much more awareness now of the impact that humans are having on the ocean’s health and the animals that live in the ocean than there was when I started on the rescue team, and that gives us hope. Part of SeaWorld’s mission is to increase awareness and education of the true impact humans are having on our oceans and the detrimental effects on marine wildlife.”

SeaWorld cites changes in sea surface temperatures, urban development and resulting habitat loss, along with ocean pollution, as primary causes and concerns impacting marine wildlife. According to SeaWorld Rescue data, for example, approximately half of the manatees rescued along Florida’s coast since 2015 were in danger from human-impacted activities, including paralysis caused by cold stress or red tide as seawater temperatures dramatically change with the climate, injuries caused by boat strikes, or entanglement in marine debris.

“The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service would like to express our sincere gratitude to SeaWorld on behalf of the West Indian manatee on World Oceans Day and every day,” said Jay Herrington, field supervisor for U.S.  Fish and Wildlife Service’s North Florida Ecological Services Office.  “The rescue team and veterinary staff have always gone above and beyond for these animals, pairing a love for Florida’s beloved state marine mammal with a desire to contribute to manatee conservation and recovery. This dedication by the SeaWorld team to help save the species has extended across the Florida border, as they have led manatee rescue operations from Massachusetts to Texas with many other partners in marine conservation.”

SeaWorld’s rescue team is on call 24/7, 365 days of the year, partnering with multiple government agencies, including the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), to rescue and rehabilitate animals, with the ultimate goal of restoring them to full health so they can return to their natural habitat.In cases where a rescued animal is deemed non-releasable by NOAA or another federal agency, however, SeaWorld is one of many facilities on call nation-wide to provide world-class care from its dedicated team of animal specialists and veterinarians.
"SeaWorld has been a long-standing valuable partner in promoting marine conservation, and rescuing and rehabilitating stranded, entangled or imperiled marine wildlife," said Donna Wieting, Director of NOAA Fisheries' Office of Protected Resources. "On World Oceans Day, NOAA and SeaWorld remind the public that they, too, have an important role in reporting stranded or injured marine animals.”
In addition to SeaWorld’s rescue efforts, the company’s team of experienced zoologists and researchers are working on the frontlines of conservation around the globe to help some of the estimated one million species that are being driven toward extinction. From developing new tools at its Species Preservation Laboratory in California to help repopulate threatened species, to conducting critical killer whale research within its parks that aids in the conservation of threatened southern resident killer whales in the Pacific Northwest, to practicing conservation medicine to rehabilitate endangered species like the Guadalupe fur seal, the various species in SeaWorld’s care are providing a trove of scientific data that scientists can tap to better diagnose and understand threats to the health of their wild counterparts.
“For SeaWorld, our commitment to conservation runs deeper than saving a single animal on a beach,” said Peterson. “We want to save and support their entire species, the ecosystem that they live in, and the food sources that they feed on.”

About SeaWorld Entertainment, Inc.
SeaWorld Entertainment, Inc. (NYSE: SEAS) is a leading theme park and entertainment company providing experiences that matter, and inspiring guests to protect animals and the wild wonders of our world. The Company is one of the world's foremost zoological organizations and a global leader in animal welfare, training, husbandry and veterinary care. The Company collectively cares for what it believes is one of the largest zoological collections in the world and has helped lead advances in the care of animals. The Company also rescues and rehabilitates marine and terrestrial animals that are ill, injured, orphaned or abandoned, with the goal of returning them to the wild. The SeaWorld® rescue team has helped more than 35,000 animals in need over the last 55 years.  SeaWorld Entertainment, Inc. owns or licenses a portfolio of recognized brands including SeaWorld, Busch Gardens®, Aquatica®, Sesame Place® and Sea Rescue®. Over its more than 55-year history, the Company has built a diversified portfolio of 12 destination and regional theme parks that are grouped in key markets across the United States, many of which showcase its one-of-a-kind zoological collection. The Company's theme parks feature a diverse array of rides, shows and other attractions with broad demographic appeal which deliver memorable experiences and a strong value proposition for its guests.
Copies of this and other news releases as well as additional information about SeaWorld Entertainment, Inc. can be obtained online at www.seaworldentertainment.com. Shareholders and prospective investors can also register to automatically receive the Company's press releases, SEC filings and other notices by e-mail by registering at that website.
How You Can Help
The number of animal rescues has increased in recent years in part because more and more people are calling in animal injuries or strandings, enabling the rescue team to respond more quickly and efficiently. If you come across an ill, stranded or injured animal, contact animal rescue teams in the following regions:
·        West Coast: SeaWorld San Diego is part of the West Coast Marine Mammal Stranding Network. Members of the public, lifeguards and other individuals can report strandings to SeaWorld's rescue hotline (800-541-SEAL).
·        Florida & the East Coast: Stranded animals in Florida and along the East Coast can be reported by calling the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-404-FWCC (888-404-3922). Cellular phone users can call *FWC or #FWC.
·       Texas: SeaWorld San Antonio is part of the Texas Marine Mammal Stranding Network. The hotline is 800-9MAMMAL (800-962-6625). To report a stranded sea turtle, call the Texas Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network at 361-949-8173 ext. 226.

March 14, 2019

Brevard Zoo sees influx of sea turtle patients


MELBOURNE, Fla., March 12, 2019 — Brevard Zoo’s Sea Turtle Healing Center admitted 13 green sea turtles between Friday and Sunday. The cause of this influx is unknown.
The turtles arrived in a debilitated state, laden with algae and barnacles that interfered with their ability to swim. Some are suffering from additional ailments like inflammation and sepsis. They are being treated with fluids, antibiotics, vitamins, nutritional support and a safe place to rest.
Though the Healing Center typically only holds around 12 sea turtles at a time, staff and volunteers creatively reconfigured the space to accommodate an all-time high of 26 patients as other facilities in the state also neared capacity. On Monday, 12 turtles were transferred to the Turtle Hospital in Marathon.

Seven Manatees Get a Second Chance at Life Following Months of Rehabilitation and Care Multiple Facilities Come Together to Provide Specialized Care


Orlando, Fla. (March 11, 2019) -- Seven rescued manatees are getting a second chance at life after months of rehabilitation, thanks to the dedicated efforts of multiple facilities including SeaWorld Orlando, the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium,  the Jacksonville Zoo and GardensSouth Florida Museum U.S Fish and Wildlife and The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC).   All are a part of the Manatee Rescue and Rehabilitation Partnership (MRP), a cooperative group of non-profit, private, state, and federal entities who work together to monitor the health and survival of rehabilitated and returned manatees.

All seven of the manatees were tagged prior to release, allowing Clearwater Marine Aquarium Research Institute to monitor their movements, contributing to ongoing research and conservation of the species.

February 13, 2019

SEAWORLD ORLANDO RESCUES JUVENILE MANATEE


Less than one year after return to local waters, “Buckeye” is back at SeaWorld’s Critical Care Facility

Orlando, Fla. (February 13, 2019) – Yesterday, late on February 12, an orphaned manatee, rescued and rehabilitated by the SeaWorld Rescue Team and partner facilities in 2015, is back at SeaWorld Orlando after teams were alerted to an unaccountable weight loss in the juvenile male. 
Buckeye was first rescued - orphaned and underweight - in Daytona Beach, Florida in September, 2015.  He spent more than two years with the SeaWorld animal care team for extended rehabilitation and care, including round the clock attention and bottle feedings.  He was transferred to the Jacksonville Zoo as part of the Manatee Rescue & Rehabilitation Partnership (MRP) in late 2017 and was returned to Blue Springs State Park in March 2018 more than 600 lbs. heavier, a healthy weight to be able to thrive in a natural environment, especially during colder winter months. 

January 30, 2019

SEAWORLD ORLANDO’S FIRST COLD STRESSED MANATEE OF THE YEAR ARRIVES


Rescued male suffering from hypothermia as local water temperatures drop

Orlando, FL (January 30, 2019) – As much of the country prepares for dangerously cold temperatures this week, rescue teams in Florida are starting to see the effects of low water temperatures on the state’s manatee population.   
Late yesterday, a 725 lb. sub-adult male manatee arrived to SeaWorld Orlando’s critical care animal hospital, suffering from symptoms of cold stress including abbesses and dehydration. The manatee was rescued in Lake Griffin near Eustis, Florida, in the center of the state, by Florida Fish and Wildlife (FWC), Sea2Shore and a local chapter of the Save the Manatee Club.  After a field assessment, the animal was transported to the park where veterinarians started medical treatment and rehabilitation including antibiotics, fluids and other supportive care.

April 10, 2018

SeaWorld Animal Rescue Team Caring for Mother-and-Calf Manatee Pair


ORLANDO, Fla. (April 9, 2018) – Earlier this evening, the Clearwater Marine Aquarium transported a distressed mother manatee – and her nursing calf – from North Fort Myers to SeaWorld Orlando for rehabilitation and care. The pair was rescued by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) after the mother manatee was observed floating and experiencing buoyancy issues. 

Buoyancy issues can negatively impact a manatee’s health, eating patterns and the nursing of a dependent calf and if not corrected can be life-threatening. The condition is known as a pneumothorax and it was potentially caused by the blunt force of a boat strike. The calf is estimated to be a 1-year-old and, although unharmed, is still nursing and dependent on its mother. It is important that the pair remain together as the calf continues to grow and learn from its mother.

So far this year, SeaWorld Orlando’s Animal Rescue Team has rescued 30 manatees and returned 7.

November 11, 2017

Rehabilitated Manatee Returned during Manatee Awareness Month

Randall’s rescue story brings awareness to manatee entrapment

Orlando, Fla. (Thursday, November 9) – Earlier today, Randall the manatee was returned to the wild after spending nearly a year in rehabilitation following his stranding in Camp Branch Creek in the Rodman Reservoir complex in Putnam County.

“Randall’s case is not unique. Every year, manatees become entrapped and require assistance. As in this instance, the public can help by reporting trapped manatees and can help prevent entrapments from occurring in the first place,” said Jim Valade, Manatee Recovery Coordinator with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

September 15, 2017

SeaWorld Orlando Rescue Team on the Move After Hurricane Irma

 Reports of displaced, stranded animals keep teams busy


Orlando, Fla. (Sept. 15, 2017) – As Florida continues to clean up in the wake of Hurricane Irma, it’s been a busy week for the SeaWorld Orlando Rescue team. Reports of stranded, displaced and injured animals have increased, and the park’s rescue team, along with partner and government agencies, has been called to assist.

On Thursday, Sept. 14, a manatee calf was found orphaned or abandoned in Southwest Florida, presumably as a result of Hurricane Irma.  Manatee calves and moms have tight bonds, and if a calf is seen without a mom around for several hours it's very likely that calf has been orphaned.  Since manatees nurse for 1-2 years, a calf on its own has very little chance of survival.  

April 14, 2017

SeaWorld Orlando Returns Largest Rescued Loggerhead Sea Turtle in Company History to the Wild


Orlando, Fla. (April 12, 2017) – After nearly eight months of specialized care, SeaWorld Orlando’s Rescue Team and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) returned the largest Loggerhead Sea Turtle ever rehabilitated by SeaWorld back home to the ocean. The turtle was released this morning at Vero Beach.
The female Loggerhead was estimated to be at least 20 years old with a weight of nearly 350 pounds. The turtle was found lethargic and covered in algae at Tracking Station Park in Vero Beach last August. Upon arrival at SeaWorld, her blood work revealed a significant parasite problem. The team treated the turtle with antibiotics and anti-parasitic medications to clear her system while also addressing injuries on her front flippers.

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